DDD Home Page
DDD Music Lists Page
DDD Movie Lists Page
It is currently Thu Sep 18, 2014 8:42 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2091 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 ... 140  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 2:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:21 pm
Posts: 14142
Ssoyd wrote:
More Uriah Heep with great Bass by Gary Thain. Tell me he doesn't deserve a spot in the top 50 at least.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqszsnt2FTU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLCq9X1j ... =fvwp&NR=1

I'm sick of lesser players being recognized while Thain is ignored. The same is true of Heep, one of the best bands of the 70's.


Oh yeah I remember getting that album for my 18th birthday back in '02. Great stuff throughout, although I prefer Heep in the studio personally.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 2:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
Negative Creep wrote:
Ssoyd wrote:
More Uriah Heep with great Bass by Gary Thain. Tell me he doesn't deserve a spot in the top 50 at least.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqszsnt2FTU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLCq9X1j ... =fvwp&NR=1

I'm sick of lesser players being recognized while Thain is ignored. The same is true of Heep, one of the best bands of the 70's.


Oh yeah I remember getting that album for my 18th birthday back in '02. Great stuff throughout, although I prefer Heep in the studio personally.


The sound is less than stellar in these live recordings to say the least. If you had heard them in person back then you would have to say their live performance was better than the studio work. Much more intense and exciting.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 10:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:28 pm
Posts: 10
I just joined this forum. I've been reading these past posts and these are really interesting discussions. I look forward to participating!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 10:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 pm
Posts: 797
Coconut73 wrote:
I just joined this forum. I've been reading these past posts and these are really interesting discussions. I look forward to participating!


Welcome Coconut73. What we lack in numbers we make up for in passion. Some quite knowledgable folks around here. Please feel free to join right in.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 12:56 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:21 pm
Posts: 14142
There are certain posters who are aficionados of different things here.
If you wanna learn about bass guitar, you talk to Stu.
If you wanna learn about drumming, you talk to Classic Rock Junkie.
If you wanna learn about guitar, you talk to George.
If you wanna have a generally more open-minded view of rock as a whole, you talk to Sampson.
If you wanna learn about the oldies/Motown generation stuff, you talk to Bruce/Stu/Sampson.
If you wanna learn about psychedelia, you talk to Rick.

Oh, and if you wanna learn about Elvis, you talk to ME.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 2:25 am 
Offline
moderator

Joined: Wed Oct 13, 2010 2:05 am
Posts: 1922
Negative Creep wrote:
There are certain posters who are aficionados of different things here.
If you wanna learn about bass guitar, you talk to Stu.
If you wanna learn about drumming, you talk to Classic Rock Junkie.
If you wanna learn about guitar, you talk to George.
If you wanna have a generally more open-minded view of rock as a whole, you talk to Sampson.
If you wanna learn about the oldies/Motown generation stuff, you talk to Bruce/Stu/Sampson.
If you wanna learn about psychedelia, you talk to Rick.

Oh, and if you wanna learn about Elvis, you talk to ME.


I wouldn't necessarily call Sampson 'open minded' view of rock. I love the guy and his posts, but he seems, at least to me, very US/western bias. Idk, but yeah those are the right people. Welcome to the forum? Play an instrument?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 3:27 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:21 pm
Posts: 14142
Classic Rock Junkie wrote:
I wouldn't necessarily call Sampson 'open minded' view of rock. I love the guy and his posts, but he seems, at least to me, very US/western bias.


I was referring more to being open-minded in what kind of music you listen to. Not sure if you're aware, but I've been on DDD since about 2002. It was him, more than anyone else, who really got me to open my mind and expand my musical horizons.
Up to that time, I was more or less a classic rock/hard rock "elitist".


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 1:37 pm 
Offline
moderator

Joined: Wed Oct 13, 2010 2:05 am
Posts: 1922
Oh yeah he's very good at expanding musical horizons, I agree with that.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 3:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:21 pm
Posts: 14142
Anyone else think Glover is way too low?
Guy was sooooooooo underrated.

Fantastic groove when he wanted to show it, just listen to that jam section of Child In Time. Killer stuff.
Then you have crazy shit like his distorted monster bass in Fireball and No One Came.
He kinda got 'lost in the shuffle', so to speak, among the other hard rock guys like Jones and Butler, but Roger Glover was still an awesome bass player.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 2:09 pm
Posts: 1162
Hughes even moreso. He's quite versatile, as evidenced by his funk and slap playing on "Come Taste the Band".


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 10:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:21 pm
Posts: 14142
Yeah Hughes is great for sure, but I feel that he is largely recognized and acknowledged for his talent, while Glover was seemingly lost in the shuffle.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 10:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 2:09 pm
Posts: 1162
Much moreso as a vocalist though.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 11:10 pm 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
Ssoyd wrote:
Ariel wrote:

That's all for now, but I'd be happy to post more if anyone wants. Cheers. PS Burton's playing was also consistently incredibly expressive, rich and imaginative in Metallica's more 'normal' songs too (see Sanitarium, Fade to Black, Battery, Master of Puppets, The Four Horsemen for evidence!) Cheers


I'm sorry but I'm just not impressed. Use of distortion and effects cannot hide the fact that his bass playing was IMO good certainly but not exceptional. Maybe it's a matter of taste as I'm not into bass effects.


If I may, I do think it is a matter of taste in this case. I think the *way* he used distortion and effects was extremely imaginative and frankly unprecedented. Diff'rent strokes...

D.J. wrote:
I'm sorry Ariel but what made Lesh and Casady more innovative, influential and important in the history of rock bass of Deacon? Deacon's body of work could easily contain easily five or more great basslines in the top 50 rock greatest basslines ever, he's famous for his walking bass lines, his fast bass runs and and quick note changes which made his style playing so unique and recognizable.
Anyway I totally agree about the talent and creativity thing.


Might be taking a liberty here but IMO Deacon basically took after McCartney style wise, very similar style: subtlety & finesse, perfect note choice/placement, sophisticated harmonic counterpoint. What's amazing and speaks to Deaky's talent is he did it *as well* as Macca! No question Deaky is a musical genius and in the top, elite tier of bass creativity.

From what I've heard from people Lesh & Casady's approaches were like entirely new when they hit the scene, whereas IMO Deaky's approach was taking after Macca's.

D.J. wrote:
Any news about Saunders and Flowers embracing the top 100?


Flowers is basically a lock, I'll be surprised if he doesn't make the list. Not sure about Saunders yet. Thanks for bringing them both up, I think Flowers, at minimum, is a necessary guy for this list and it would be invalid without him on it probably.

Negative Creep wrote:
Ariel wrote:
Ahahahahahaha

hahahahahahahahahahhaah

This is ONE POST after you declared Steve this one of a kind creative genius hahahaha


I said he was unique, not necessarily creative. He's very distinct. I do think he has some creativity, but that Hamm performance really amazed me.


I fail to see how it's possible to be unique but not creative. Not trying to pick on you, just sayin'

That Hamm performance is a work of art, indeed. It's absolutely earth shakingly outstanding.

More epic Hamm:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LSwiMapeFs

What do you think?

Yngtchie Blacksteen wrote:
I'd say that LePond is just as capable as Miller was, the main difference is that Miller would be more upfront with his playing, flashier so to speak.


Not impressed by LePond on the basis of 'Domination'. Any other songs I should check out? Thanks

Ssoyd wrote:
Heep is under appreciated because they got lost in the shuffle with all the great Hard Rock/Metal bands that were around back then. I saw so many great bands live in the 70's that I barely remember them all but 3 concerts stand out as the best, Uriah Heep in 1973, Deep Purple around 1972 and Jethro Tull in 1973.


That's absolutely awesome. I'm a huge Tull fan and from everything I've seen and heard (clips and stuff) they're absolutely deserving of their reputation as one of the top live bands ever in rock and Ian as one of rock's best frontmen ever. Was fortunate to see 'em in '05, Ian's voice sucks but man is he charismatic...great show

Coconut73 wrote:
I just joined this forum. I've been reading these past posts and these are really interesting discussions. I look forward to participating!


Welcome to the forum! Looking forward to discussin' w/ you :cheers:

Negative Creep wrote:
Anyone else think Glover is way too low?
Guy was sooooooooo underrated.

Fantastic groove when he wanted to show it, just listen to that jam section of Child In Time. Killer stuff.
Then you have crazy shit like his distorted monster bass in Fireball and No One Came.
He kinda got 'lost in the shuffle', so to speak, among the other hard rock guys like Jones and Butler, but Roger Glover was still an awesome bass player.


I'm perplexed at him being low too to some extent. I need to start buying some DP. I suspect he'll get raised. Thanks for bringing him up, good point about him being low.

beaverteeth92 wrote:
Hughes even moreso. He's quite versatile, as evidenced by his funk and slap playing on "Come Taste the Band".


Surprised Hughes isn't on the list already. I need to check him out. Song recommendations if you don't mind?

Also, he's aged terribly, hahaha

Ssoyd wrote:
More Uriah Heep with great Bass by Gary Thain. Tell me he doesn't deserve a spot in the top 50 at least.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqszsnt2FTU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLCq9X1j ... =fvwp&NR=1

I'm sick of lesser players being recognized while Thain is ignored. The same is true of Heep, one of the best bands of the 70's.


Very impressed with the music, very good, thanks for posting, I should check them out, it's a shame they're semi forgotten

Not seeing the top 50 argument, but he's damn good. Post some more performances!

StuBass wrote:
Lloyd Brevett passed away Thursday at the age of 80. Brevett was a founding member of the Skatalites and is considered the Godfather of Jamaican bassists and Jamaican music in general...comparable to Louis Armstrongs influence on American Jazz. He has received numerous awards and honors in his native country. He was Phil Chens early primary influence.


Rest in Peace hero


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 11:13 pm 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
beaver what do you think of my proposed re-ordering of the 18-24 spots?

18. Phil Lesh/Jack Casady
19. Phil Lesh/Jack Casady
20. Cliff Burton
21. Steve Harris
22. Stu Hamm
23. John Deacon
24. Aston "Family Man" Barrett

Something like that, that's not definite though, just a rough thought for the moment

Also Neg please check out the myspace link I posted on the last page! You'll love it, great GREAT GREAT late 60s band (the myspace page is a tribute which has some of their music on it)

Stu did Lloyd Brevett play electric/should I look into him for this list?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 11:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 pm
Posts: 797
Ariel wrote:
beaver what do you think of my proposed re-ordering of the 18-24 spots?

18. Phil Lesh/Jack Casady
19. Phil Lesh/Jack Casady
20. Cliff Burton
21. Steve Harris
22. Stu Hamm
23. John Deacon
24. Aston "Family Man" Barrett

Something like that, that's not definite though, just a rough thought for the moment

Also Neg please check out the myspace link I posted on the last page! You'll love it, great GREAT GREAT late 60s band (the myspace page is a tribute which has some of their music on it)

Stu did Lloyd Brevett play electric/should I look into him for this list?


Brevett was an upright player who was instrumental in the development of SKA music along with Ernest Ranglin and others with their band The Skatalites. SKA was the 50's and early 60's forrunner to Jamaican Reggae, and everyone including Bob Marley was influenced by it. SKA took Carribean, Afro Cuban, American Jump, early rock and Jazz and came up with unique Jamaican sound. Family Man Barrett also claims Brevett as a major influence. I'd say that Brevett was to Jamaican bass what Cacho Lopez was to Cuban bass. Brevett should rank quite high on an all genre or upright bassist list.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2091 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 ... 140  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:

DigitalDreamDoor.com   

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

DigitalDreamDoor Forum is one part of a music and movie list website whose owner has given its visitors
the privilege to discuss music and movies, and has no control and cannot in any way be held liable over
how, or by whom this board is used. If you read or see anything inappropriate that has been posted,
contact webmaster@digitaldreamdoor.com. Comments in the forum are reviewed before list updates.
Topics include rock music, metal, rap, hip-hop, blues, jazz, songs, albums, guitar, drums, musicians...


DDD Home Page | DDD Music Lists Page | DDD Movie Lists Page