DDD Home Page
DDD Music Lists Page
DDD Movie Lists Page
It is currently Wed Oct 01, 2014 5:17 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2091 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58 ... 140  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Jim Fielder
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 8:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
Here's a plug for former Blood , Sweat and Tears Bassist Jim Fielder to be considered for the list. He's not that well known today but back in the 60's he was considered outstanding. He also played with Tim Buckley, The Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield. He since has done primarily session work and is a member of Neil Sedaka's band.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxWSOuNs ... re=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v96P_AXzto


Last edited by Ssoyd on Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jim Fielder
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 pm
Posts: 797
Ssoyd wrote:
Here's a plug for former Blood , Sweat and Tears Bassist Jim Fielder to be considered for the list. He's not that well known today but back in the 60's he was considered outstanding. He also played with Tim Buckley, The Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield. He since has done primarily session work and is a member of Neil Sedaka's band.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxWSOuNs ... re=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v96P_AXzto


Like Peter Cetera...Fielder played in an ensemble dominated by horns. His primary responsibility was to hold down the pocket for the horns and vocals. Agree that he did that job quite well and perhaps deserves a spot.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jim Fielder
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
StuBass wrote:
Ssoyd wrote:
Here's a plug for former Blood , Sweat and Tears Bassist Jim Fielder to be considered for the list. He's not that well known today but back in the 60's he was considered outstanding. He also played with Tim Buckley, The Mothers of Invention and Buffalo Springfield. He since has done primarily session work and is a member of Neil Sedaka's band.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxWSOuNs ... re=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v96P_AXzto


Like Peter Cetera...Fielder played in an ensemble dominated by horns. His primary responsibility was to hold down the pocket for the horns and vocals. Agree that he did that job quite well and perhaps deserves a spot.


The thing is he's a better bass player than many that are on the list.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 12:37 am 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/list ... music.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 1:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 pm
Posts: 797
Ariel wrote:
http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lists/2011/10/20-underrated-bass-guitarists-in-popular-music.html


Page 1...Eeh
Page 2...Most of those guys are "underrated" only by folks that don't know the first thing about bass. Never knew Duck Dunn made "Motown" funky. Never even knew he ever stepped foot in the "snakepit"???


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 1:21 am 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
Hahaha ouch. Nice.

Funny thing is I actually basically linked that in part to make you happy over the high Pino placement :-)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 1:49 am 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
boo boo wrote:
Stuff about 50s bassists


Basically tabling that discussion for now, but I do appreciate hearing some of your thoughts on how that whole shindig will turn out. I do often wonder if Bill Black was actually influential enough on the electric bass to deserve a spot here...does playing with Elvis *necessarily* make your style influential if your style itself is generic? Bleh...

boo boo wrote:
Phil Lynot is totally an underrated bassist, watchoo talkin bout? Anyone who doubts his groove should listen to Black Rose: A Rock Legend on a good subwoofer


What is that, a dvd? A compilation Thin Lizzy thing?

boo boo wrote:
I don't think Jason Newsted should be on this list at all, I don't think he's "the worst bassist EVAR!!1!!!" like some Cliff Burton fanboys would have you believe but he really was pretty forgettable and disposable IMO. I can't think of a single memorable bassline he's ever done that wasn't just following the guitar riff. The bass intro to My Friend of Misery is pretty cool, that's about all I can think of.


The thing is that history or fate has been rather cruel to Jason. He puts in a MONSTER creative performance on ...Justice and gets buried to the point of being inaudible. Then the Black album which is like the one Metallica album (other than Master) that everyone actually knows is unfortunately a pretty piss poor representation of his talent as it catches him during a transitional period as a musician. Finally he rocks like a beast on Load and ReLoad but no one pays attention cuz everyone hates those albums and no one listens to them. Same with Garage Inc. He's a BEAST on S&M, easily the best musician in Metallica at those concerts and endessly tasty, but again, largely buried, at least during the songs where he really goes all out (e.g. Call of Ktulu).

Did I even mention Flotsam and Jetsam, his pre-Metallica thrash band? There's a reason they picked Jason of all the many MANY hopefuls...he was simply the best bassist active in metal in 1986 after Cliff died. Easily.

I should mention it took a Flotsam CD buy (Doomsday for the Deceiver, their first album/the one with Jason) and a good amount of youtube listens of Justice and S&M material (remixes with boosted original bass, courtesy of Guitar Hero Metallica), as well as close listening to the Load albums, to come to realize how frickin amazing Jason is. He's actually my favorite bassist ever believe it or not.

Boo Boo wrote:
HELL YES on Peter Hook, Sting, Paul Simonon, Andy Rourke, JJ Burnell and Tina Weymouth. I detest how some of these lists pretend that punk rock, new wave and alternative rock never happened. It's infuriating.


Baller. Glad to get some support on guys like Rourke and Burnell, they're (sadly) fairly obscure as individual musicians. I suspect all of these dudes you mention will get a spot in the end.

Boo Boo wrote:
Peter Cetera is also a good choice. And I love me some Ray Schulman, I don't know if he's influencial enough to make the list since he's relatively obscure, but he's truly one of the most underrated players in the business.


As I keep saying here, after the top 50 or whatever on this list the very influential players have pretty much already been listed, and I reckon the bottom part of the list ought rightly to showcase some phenomenal talents who deserve note for their talent and passion. It's not like there are anywhere near 100 truly very influential rock bassists anyway.

Boo Boo wrote:
Roger Waters is underrated, lots of people hate his bass playing for how basic it is and yes David Gilmour is a better bass player, but I love his laid back approach and early Floyd wouldn't be what it is without it, and Money is obviously one of the most iconic basslines ever. Still, probably not top 100 material.


I actually think Roger was considerably more talented. He had a very unique style that was subtle and therefore requires close listens to fully appreciate the nuances of. Minimalistic but toward an artistic end/as a style. I couldn't see Roger not getting at least a low spot in the end, he's too creative IMO.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 1:58 am 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
Ssoyd wrote:
Sean Malone? Yes and not just because he plays fretless.
Lemmy? Possibly because he created a style and is good at it although he's not very technical or versatile.


Very interesting, didn't take you for a metalhead Ssoyd :wink: In all seriousness though, I appreciate your endorsement of Malone, makes me take him that much more seriously. Need to actually listen to his stuff sooner or later...

Boo Boo wrote:
I think Sting has had a considerable influence on the younger breed of rock bassists that followed in his path who adopted a combination of reggae/jazz/minimalist elements in their playing, particularly the ska punk and alternative metal bands that came about in the 90s.


I actually am inclined to agree with Boobs here or at least take what he's saying seriously and as worth serious consideration. Certainly it seems to me Sting was THE bassist who brought in reggae influences and ska influences who wasn't himself a reggae dude. Did the future ska-influenced guys actually get that style from him though?

Cripplers Quest wrote:
Peter Hook should be top 50. Beastly bass player whose influence is huge in alternative and post punk, new wave, and related strains of rock


Thanks for your input! Glad to hear it. Hook definitely does impress me.

StuBass wrote:
My metal friends speak highly of Tony Choys skills. He slaps and pops in that genre and with a latin flair also crosses his skills over to pop.


YOU...METAL FRIENDS? ahahaa :wink: Seriously though, your friends are right, Choy is so amazing...(from the little I've heard)

StuBass wrote:
Rex Brown...Panteras music doesn't really lend itself to exposing terrific bass skills, but Rex is more than just a thrashy bass player...working with guys like Jerry Cantrell. Rex also has a background and appreciation in jazz.


Honestly I've come to think Rex is pretty underrated. Seems like a nice guy too, and I'll never forget your golf story ahaha. Very interesting to hear about the jazz background. Unfortunately though unless he has bass work more interesting than that in Pantera I question whether he'll make the top 100 in the end :-(


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 2:03 am 
Offline
moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:19 am
Posts: 1408
StuBass wrote:
Couple of quick takes...

Louis Johnson ahead of Anthony Jackson? Can't see that. Louis down 4 or 5 slots. AJ up one.

Pino should be in Abe Laboriels slot (IMO). Abe drops down 5-10.


Re: Louis & AJ...Bassfreak as I recall was under the impression when he originally ordered those two that Louis was basically the guy singlehandedly responsible for elevating the slap style from being very primitive e.g. Thank You Falettinme... to being the modern, playing-with-rhythm/onbeat-then-offbeat-then-back, muted-notes-alternated-with-slaps-and-pops thing we all know and love. If this is true I just can't see Louis really dropping much at all. If it isn't, though...

Re: Pino/Abe...I need to look more into Abe but I get the feeling he's *mostly* a jazz/fusion dude. Pino definitely will raise a great deal, I'm thinking top 50 somewhere as it stands, maybe top 40 (and bear in mind I originally figured 60s or something).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 6:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
Ariel wrote:

The thing is that history or fate has been rather cruel to Jason. He puts in a MONSTER creative performance on ...Justice and gets buried to the point of being inaudible. Then the Black album which is like the one Metallica album (other than Master) that everyone actually knows is unfortunately a pretty piss poor representation of his talent as it catches him during a transitional period as a musician. Finally he rocks like a beast on Load and ReLoad but no one pays attention cuz everyone hates those albums and no one listens to them. Same with Garage Inc. He's a BEAST on S&M, easily the best musician in Metallica at those concerts and endessly tasty, but again, largely buried, at least during the songs where he really goes all out (e.g. Call of Ktulu).

Did I even mention Flotsam and Jetsam, his pre-Metallica thrash band? There's a reason they picked Jason of all the many MANY hopefuls...he was simply the best bassist active in metal in 1986 after Cliff died. Easily.

I should mention it took a Flotsam CD buy (Doomsday for the Deceiver, their first album/the one with Jason) and a good amount of youtube listens of Justice and S&M material (remixes with boosted original bass, courtesy of Guitar Hero Metallica), as well as close listening to the Load albums, to come to realize how frickin amazing Jason is. He's actually my favorite bassist ever believe it or not.



Couple of notes I've read about Newstead and Metallica. When they hired him it wasn't because he was the best bassist but the one that fit in with their music best. Les Claypool actually auditioned for the position but they rejected him because he was "too good". I suspect they wanted someone who showed more restraint.

Newstead is a good bassist for sure but in an interview after Metallica he said one reason he left was because the band held him back and put restraints on his playing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 6:20 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
Ariel wrote:
Ssoyd wrote:
Sean Malone? Yes and not just because he plays fretless.
Lemmy? Possibly because he created a style and is good at it although he's not very technical or versatile.


Very interesting, didn't take you for a metalhead Ssoyd :wink: In all seriousness though, I appreciate your endorsement of Malone, makes me take him that much more seriously. Need to actually listen to his stuff sooner or later...

(


When you're my age you go through all kinds of music. My interest in Metal started in 1969 with Sabbath's first album. I'll never forget the chills I got when those massive Iommi power chords in the intro to the song "Black Sabbath" came blasting out of my huge Klipsch Cornwalls. Tony BTW was just diagnosed with Lymphoma so here's hoping for a full recovery.

Back in the 70's I actually played in a Heavy Metal/Hard Rock Band. I like everything from Metal to Country, from Blues to Jazz even Hip Hop and Pop as long as it's good.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 pm
Posts: 797
Most of my "metal friends" today wear suits but have been metal fans for years. When a drummer friend asked me to listen to a CD of his drummer son who was touring with some thrash metal band I politely made it through about 1/3 of a song before my ears were forced to surrender. I'm sure there are some talented musicians in that genre...but I can't tell too well by listening to most of the music which leaves me...well, just leaves me.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
StuBass wrote:
Most of my "metal friends" today wear suits but have been metal fans for years. When a drummer friend asked me to listen to a CD of his drummer son who was touring with some thrash metal band I politely made it through about 1/3 of a song before my ears were forced to surrender. I'm sure there are some talented musicians in that genre...but I can't tell too well by listening to most of the music which leaves me...well, just leaves me.


Much of today's Metal isn't very musical and instead relies on super fast staccato rhythms played by the band in unison with the lead singer grunting unintelligible lyrics over one or 2 chords while his band mates swing their hair in circles. Maybe it's my age but that gets boring fast.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 1:26 am
Posts: 7614
Location: New Jersey
Ssoyd wrote:
My interest in Metal started in 1969 with Sabbath's first album.


1969 - NO WAY.

Unless you were given an advance copy a couple months before the album was released.

The album was not released until February of 1970.

http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/ ... k_sabbath/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Rock Bass Guitarists
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2012 11:02 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 3:06 pm
Posts: 401
Bruce wrote:
Ssoyd wrote:
My interest in Metal started in 1969 with Sabbath's first album.


1969 - NO WAY.

Unless you were given an advance copy a couple months before the album was released.

The album was not released until February of 1970.

http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/ ... k_sabbath/


Yes you are right. 1970. I think 1969 was when I first heard Led Zeppelin but they weren't a true HM band.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2091 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58 ... 140  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:

DigitalDreamDoor.com   

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group

DigitalDreamDoor Forum is one part of a music and movie list website whose owner has given its visitors
the privilege to discuss music and movies, and has no control and cannot in any way be held liable over
how, or by whom this board is used. If you read or see anything inappropriate that has been posted,
contact webmaster@digitaldreamdoor.com. Comments in the forum are reviewed before list updates.
Topics include rock music, metal, rap, hip-hop, blues, jazz, songs, albums, guitar, drums, musicians...


DDD Home Page | DDD Music Lists Page | DDD Movie Lists Page