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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 2:02 am 
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Wynonie Harris is a major oversight. Otherwise, a strong list.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 1:38 am 
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On this show "Cajun Pawn Stars" tonight some guy had an acetate that
Jerry Lee made in 1952 before he had ever gone to Memphis. The owner
of the shop offered him 35K for it, but he turned it down.

http://starcasm.net/archives/137800

The record was brought in by a man named Cecil Harrison, who was a
long-time friend of Jerry Lee Lewis. (Actually, Cecil reveals that he
married Jerry Lee’s sister, but it eventually ended in divorce. And
then they got married again! Yup, sounds like a Lewis!)

Cecil was with Jerry Lee Lewis when he got the idea to record himself
– and that’s exactly what he did at a “J&M Records” do-it-yourself
recording studio, which used to be quite common. You go in, pay a
couple bucks, sing a song, and walk out with a record. What’s amazing
is that the low-grade record was still in good enough shape to play!

Cecil payed $2.25 for the recording and it was appraised on the show
to be worth at least $15,000 – $20,000. Jimmie offered as much as
$45,000, but Cecil held firm at $100,000 and walked out still in
possession of the historic recording.

One Response to “Cajun Pawn Stars uncovers lost Jerry Lee Lewis
recording from 1952”

Tom Diehl says:
January 10, 2012 at 12:10 am

Unfortunately, while that acetate shown on the tv show may be rare, it
is not worth $100,000 by any stretch of the imagination. You see, both
sides of the acetate (yes it had another song on the B side not heard
on the tv show) were included in the Time Life box set, A Half Century
Of Hits: http://www.amazon.com/Jerry-Lee-Lewis-B ... B000FIMFZK
therefore the rarity factor of the audio on the disc zilch, only the
fact that the disc itself holds the original demos is the rarity….the
songs on the box set are the last two tracks on disc 3. You can hear
both of the songs on youtube:





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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:36 am 
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Great links. Bruce, do you have Live At The Star Club? One of the best live album ever, Lewis is totally on fire...


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:28 am 
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Negative Creep wrote:
Great links. Bruce, do you have Live At The Star Club? One of the best live album ever, Lewis is totally on fire...


I have it, but I'm not big on live stuff. I'd much rather listen to the studio versions of things.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:49 am 
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Live albums often have so much energy though. Especially this one.

That version of Mean Woman Blues is absolutely fierce...


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:21 am 
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Bruce wrote:
On this show "Cajun Pawn Stars" tonight some guy had an acetate that
Jerry Lee made in 1952 before he had ever gone to Memphis. The owner
of the shop offered him 35K for it, but he turned it down.

http://starcasm.net/archives/137800

The record was brought in by a man named Cecil Harrison, who was a
long-time friend of Jerry Lee Lewis. (Actually, Cecil reveals that he
married Jerry Lee’s sister, but it eventually ended in divorce. And
then they got married again! Yup, sounds like a Lewis!)

Cecil was with Jerry Lee Lewis when he got the idea to record himself
– and that’s exactly what he did at a “J&M Records” do-it-yourself
recording studio, which used to be quite common. You go in, pay a
couple bucks, sing a song, and walk out with a record. What’s amazing
is that the low-grade record was still in good enough shape to play!

Cecil payed $2.25 for the recording and it was appraised on the show
to be worth at least $15,000 – $20,000. Jimmie offered as much as
$45,000, but Cecil held firm at $100,000 and walked out still in
possession of the historic recording.

One Response to “Cajun Pawn Stars uncovers lost Jerry Lee Lewis
recording from 1952”

Tom Diehl says:
January 10, 2012 at 12:10 am

Unfortunately, while that acetate shown on the tv show may be rare, it
is not worth $100,000 by any stretch of the imagination. You see, both
sides of the acetate (yes it had another song on the B side not heard
on the tv show) were included in the Time Life box set, A Half Century
Of Hits: http://www.amazon.com/Jerry-Lee-Lewis-B ... B000FIMFZK
therefore the rarity factor of the audio on the disc zilch, only the
fact that the disc itself holds the original demos is the rarity….the
songs on the box set are the last two tracks on disc 3. You can hear
both of the songs on youtube:





The country song he does was a hit in the spring and early summer of 1952 by Lefty Frizell. The two songs he chose to record give an excellent idea of Jerry Lee's influences. Country and boogie woogie R&B.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:33 pm 
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Just something come by the wire that said Jerry Lee and Cecil got into
a fight over the TV segment and the argument grew so heated Jerry Lee
was taken to the hospital with shortness of breath......


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:30 am 
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http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/ ... 3487.story


Johnny Otis dies at 90; R&B singer wrote 'Willie and the Hand Jive'
Johnny Otis, who is white, grew up in a predominantly black neighborhood and had a deep connection to black culture. He discovered Etta James and Little Richard.
By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
January 19, 2012

Pioneering rhythm-and-blues singer, songwriter, drummer, bandleader and disc jockey Johnny Otis made the kind of conscious life choice early on that few people have the inclination, or circumstance, to carry out.

Born white, the son of Greek immigrant parents, and raised in a predominantly black neighborhood in Northern California in the 1920s, Otis decided as a youth that he'd rather be black.

The choice put him on a path to a life in music during which he created the sensually pulsing 1958 hit "Willie and the Hand Jive." It also gave him a deep connection to black culture that helped him discover such future stars of R&B and rock as Etta James, Little Richard, Jackie Wilson, Hank Ballard and Little Esther Phillips.

"Yes, I chose," Otis told The Times in 1979, "because despite all the hardships, there's a wonderful richness in black culture that I prefer."

Otis died Tuesday in the Los Angeles area, where he had lived for much of his life, said Tom Reed, a black-music historian. He was 90.

Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, Otis continued leading a big band R&B, jazz, soul, gospel and roots-rock revue in recent years, literally and figuratively beating the drum for the music that fired his imagination.

"I get a wave of pride in America when I look back at what we've accomplished in the field of music," Otis told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2000. "People are going to wake up to this great reservoir of music we've created in America — cakewalks, one-steps, boogie-woogie, country and western. I had a bit to do with one of those traditions."

"I'm not suggesting our music is the only music," he told The Times in 1986 when the once-endangered musical style he helped create was staging a comeback, "but I am suggesting that there are certain elements in America's culture that are so precious that it would be a shame for them to go down the drain."

He was born John Veliotes on Dec. 28, 1921, in Vallejo, northeast of San Francisco, and was raised in Berkeley, where his father ran a grocery store in a largely black community.

"When I got near teen age, I was so happy with my friends and the African American culture that I couldn't imagine not being part of it," Otis told the San Diego Union-Tribune in 1991.

He started playing drums with big bands and jazz combos, and in his early 20s came to L.A. to join Harlan Leonard's Kansas City Rockers, the house band at Club Alabam on the thriving Central Avenue jazz-blues-R&B club scene.

"Man, you could go into one club and there'd be [jazz saxophone giant] Lester Young jamming, go into another and you'd find T Bone [Walker, the Texas blues guitarist and singer], and down the street Miles [Davis] would be blowing," Otis said in 1979. "Yeah, L.A. was happening."

But tough times in the late 1940s forced bandleaders to pare their large ensembles back to a small handful of players — the perfect size, as it turned out, for the new styles of R&B and rock 'n' roll that were emerging.

"To compensate for all the instruments we were eliminating, we had to put in some new ones, each with a fuller sound: an electric guitar, a blues guitar, a boogie piano," Otis told The Times in 1984, and "the sound changed too, into more of a cross between swing and country blues.... We ended up creating a whole new art form: a hybrid music that became known as rhythm and blues."

Otis scored a signature hit of that nascent style in 1946 with the moody, saxophone-driven instrumental "Harlem Nocturne," which was revived in 1960 by the white New Jersey rock group the Viscounts.

At one point, Otis was asked to judge a talent competition in Detroit and selected three winners: Wilson, Ballard and Little Willie John. Otis' talent, he once said, was being able to "see something before anyone else."

He wrote the song that became James' first charting hit — vaulting her to No. 1 on the R&B chart in 1955 — with "The Wallflower," popularly known as "Roll With Me Henry." It was a female-centric response to Ballard's sexually charged hit "Work With Me Annie" that raised eyebrows for its frankness.

Then he came up with a variant on Bo Diddley's signature 1955 hit "Bo Diddley" using the same five-count "shave-and-a-haircut, two-bits!" beat and created a smash of his own in "Willie and the Hand Jive." It's been recorded dozens of times by a wide variety of musicians, most notably by Eric Clapton in 1974.

Otis wrote other R&B hits, including "So Fine," "Double Crossing Blues" and "All Nite Long," and produced early recordings for Little Richard, Big Mama Thornton and Johnny Ace.

He also hosted early radio and television shows in L.A. and later guided new generations of listeners through music history on oldies radio shows at KPFK-FM (90.7) in L.A. and a sister station in the Bay Area.

With the British Invasion in the early 1960s, "the white boys from England came over with a recycled version of what we created. We were out of business, man," Otis said in 1994.

He saw a brief revival of interest in original R&B in the late 1960s and 1970s, when he performed with a band that included his teenage son, Shuggie, on guitar. But with the arrival of disco, then punk, hard rock and heavy metal in the 1970s, Otis was effectively forced to retire.

He turned his home in the West Adams District into the nondenominational Landmark Church and became its pastor, often leading a choir that included some of the greatest voices in pop music, including James and Esther Phillips.

In 1968, he published the book "Listen to the Lambs," a sociological critique he wrote in the wake of the Watts riots. He chronicled the music scene he knew so well in the 1994 book "Upside Your Head! Rhythm and Blues on Central Avenue." Otis even found his way into politics, serving as deputy chief of staff for Mervyn M. Dymally as the Democrat rose in state politics and served in the U.S. House of Representatives.

While cultivating his interest in painting and sculpture, Otis tended homegrown crops in Altadena and in Sebastopol in Northern California's wine country. He also opened a short-lived grocery store and for a time marketed Johnny Otis Apple Juice.

"Today's musicians are better technically," Otis said in 1979, "but that's not a virtue in itself. What's important is the emotional impact.... Most rock or disco today doesn't stir up anything in my heart — not the way a Picasso does, not the way the blues or gospel does."

Otis and his wife of 60 years, Phyllis, had several children and grandchildren.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 10:55 am 
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Johnny Otis is a true legend in R&B music . I think the obit is a little exagerrated though as to having "discovered" all those artists because he judged a talent show. LaVerne Baker discovered Jackie Wilson (as a solo artist) and took him to her manager Al Green according to Jackie himself. Jackie then was inherited by Al's protoge Nat Tarnopol upon Greens sudden death. Nat guided the remainder of Jackies career including signing him to the Brunswick group. Harry Balk was also instrumental in Little Willie Johns career and managed John after discovering him entering talent shows Harry used to hold at movie theatres he owned in Detroit...Harry eventually dumped John when Little Willies drug issues and criminal tendencies started getting out of control. Harry also managed Del Shannon and Johnny & The Hurricanes. Harry went on to become President of Motown records at one point and was the guy responsible for convincing Berry Gordy to release Marvin Gayes classic "What's Going On" against Berrys better judgement.

RIP Johnny Otis...


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:15 pm 
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Hey Bruce,
Could you take over as editor of this list?
I'm sure you're just as knowledgeable on the era as Sampson.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:44 pm 
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I'm sure Bruce will take that as a monstrous insult.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2012 8:58 pm 
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:lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 3:41 pm 
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Yeah.
Sampson is still my favorite poster in DDD history though.
I was hugely a classic rock/metal elitist when I first stumbled upon this site, and he helped me open my mind more than anyone else.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2012 3:02 pm 
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Sampson is not handing over any of his 1950's and 1960's rock artists lists. You say Sampson changed your perspective on the broad scope of rock music, yet you want another editor to take over this list? But yes, Sampson was pivotal in breaking down the whole "classic rock" mentality here.


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 Post subject: Re: Greatest Rock Artists of the 1950's
PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2012 4:50 pm 
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J.B. Trance wrote:
Sampson is not handing over any of his 1950's and 1960's rock artists lists. You say Sampson changed your perspective on the broad scope of rock music, yet you want another editor to take over this list?


Well it's kind of pointless for him to be the editor when he's not even an active member of the site.


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