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 Post subject: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 9:13 am 
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New list up, covering the biggest non-rock stuff from the 1960s.

http://digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/best_ ... p-60s.html

Criteria: - These songs were chosen and ranked based upon their initial and lasting popularity, acclaim, and their status as standards in the genre of traditional pop music.

1. My Way - Frank Sinatra
2. I Left My Heart In San Francisco - Tony Bennett
3. Summer Wind - Frank Sinatra
4. What A Wonderful World - Louis Armstrong
5. Release Me (And Let Me Love Again) - Engelbert Humperdinck
6. Strangers In The Night - Frank Sinatra
7. Moon River - Andy Williams / Henry Mancini
8. That's Life - Frank Sinatra
9. Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head - B.J. Thomas
10. People - Barbra Streisand
11. Fly Me To The Moon - Frank Sinatra
12. Everybody Loves Somebody - Dean Martin
13. Hello Dolly - Louis Armstrong
14. It Was A Very Good Year - Frank Sinatra
15. MacArthur Park - Richard Harris
16. The Girl From Ipanema - Stan Getz/Atrud Gilberto
17. More - Kai Winding / Steve Lawrence / Vic Dana
18. Green, Green, Grass of Home - Tom Jones
19. A Taste Of Honey - Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass
20. Go Away Little Girl - Steve Lawrence
21. Downtown - Petula Clark
22. This Guy's In Love With You - Herb Alpert
23. The Way You Look Tonight - Frank Sinatra / The Lettermen
24. Blue Velvet - Bobby Vinton
25. Those Were The Days - Mary Hopkin
26. I've Gotta Be Me - Sammy Davis Jr.
27. Up-Up And Away - 5th Dimension
28. Danke Schoen - Wayne Newton
29. I Say A Little Prayer - Dionne Warwick
30. The More I See You - Chris Montez
31. I Wanna Be Around - Tony Bennett
32. Sukiyaki - Kyu Sakamoto
33. Roses Are Red - Bobby Vinton
34. Ramblin' Rose - Nat "King" Cole
35. Can't Get Used To Losing You - Andy Williams
36. Honey - Bobby Goldsboro
37. Spanish Eyes - Al Martino
38. Alley Cat - Bent Fabric
39. Tijuana Taxi - Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass
40. Somethin' Stupid - Nancy Sinatra & Frank Sinatra
41. Ain't That A Kick In The Head - Dean Martin
42. Where The Boys Are - Connie Francis
43. What Kind of Fool Am I - Sammy Davis Jr. / Anthony Newley
44. The Good Life - Tony Bennett
45. Wonderland By Night - Bert Kaempfert
46. Those Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days of Summer - Nat "King" Cole
47. Al Di La - Emilio Pericolo / Connie Francis
48. When I Fall In Love - Lettermen
49. Blame It On The Bossa Nova - Eydie Gorme
50. Love Is Blue - Paul Mauriat
51. Turn Around, Look At Me - Vogues
52. Clementine - Bobby Darin
53. Pink Panther Theme - Henry Mancini
54. Artificial Flowers - Bobby Darin
55. Wives And Lovers - Jack Jones
56. The Look of Love - Sergio Mendes & Brazil '66
57. Do You Know The Way To San Jose - Dionne Warwick
58. Delilah - Tom Jones
59. Is That All There Is - Peggy Lee
60. The Shadow of Your Smile - Tony Bennett
61. Goldfinger - Shirley Bassey
62. Gina - Johnny Mathis
63. Portrait of My Love - Steve Lawrence
64. Mr. Lonely - Bobby Vinton
65. What's New Pussycat - Tom Jones
66. I Know A Place - Petula Clark
67. Somewhere, My Love - Ray Conniff Singers
68. Zorba The Greek - Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass
69. Call Me - Chris Montez / Petula Clark
70. Lazy River - Bobby Darin
71. Stranger On The Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk
72. Born Free - Roger Williams
73. Won't You Come Home Bill Bailey - Bobby Darin
74. Walk Away - Matt Monro
75. That Sunday, That Summer - Nat "King" Cole
76. Love Me With All Your Heart - Ray Charles Singers
77. Winchester Cathedral - New Vaudeville Band
78. Don't Sleep In The Subway - Petula Clark
79. Alfie - Dionne Warwick
80. A Man Without Love - Engelbert Humperdinck
81. Luck Be A Lady - Frank Sinatra
82. He Touched Me - Barbra Streisand
83. There I've Said It Again - Bobby Vinton
84. For Once In My Life - Tony Bennett
85. Guantanamera - Sandpipers
86. This Is My Song - Petula Clark
87. My Cup Runneth Over - Ed Ames
88. I'll Never Fall In Love Again - Dionne Warwick
89. Softly, As I Leave You - Frank Sinatra
90. Maria - Johnny Mathis
91. Cab Driver - Mills Brothers
92. Second Hand Rose - Barbra Streisand
93. My Love. Forgive Me - Robert Goulet
94. I Love You Because - Al Martino
95. The September of My Years - Frank Sinatra
96. Happy Days Are Here Again - Barbra Streisand
97. If I Ruled The World - Tony Bennett
98. Spanish Flea - Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass
99. Moody River - Pat Boone
100. Dominique - The Singing Nun


Last edited by Bruce on Fri Mar 29, 2013 1:08 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 5:59 pm 
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Interesting list. We tend to think of the Sixties as the era of The Beatles, soul, psychedelia, girl groups, etc., and it was, but we forget that traditional pop was still a big thing at the time. A few thoughts:

Bruce wrote:
New list up, covering the biggest non-rock stuff from the 1960s.

http://digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/best_ ... p-60s.html

Criteria: - These songs were chosen and ranked based upon their initial and lasting popularity, acclaim, and their status as standards in the genre of traditional pop music.

1. My Way - Frank Sinatra
2. I Left My Heart In San Francisco - Tony Bennett
3. Summer Wind - Frank Sinatra
4. What A Wonderful World - Louis Armstrong
5. Release Me (And Let Me Love Again) - Engelbert Humperdinck


At first, it's really jarring to see this here, because the songs around it have gained great stature as true standards, and this one--not so much. Still, what it lacks in lasting popularity and acclaim it may make up for in initial popularity--it was certainly a much bigger hit at the time then most of the others here.

Bruce wrote:
9. Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head - B.J. Thomas


The highest-ranking thing here by an artist with some claim to being a rocker. It's very difficult to know where to draw the line. Nothing you listed really seems too "rock" to fit, so that's good.

Bruce wrote:
26. Clementine - Bobby Darin


HUH? This one really puzzles me. Not that big a hit (#21 pop), kind of goofy, not something I recall hearing on the radio or anything. Seems way too high to me. (Its immediate predecessor, "Beyond The Sea", would place very high if it had been released a little later.) Overall I think Darin may be overrepresented here.

Bruce wrote:
51. Up-Up And Away - 5th Dimension


This seems kind of low. Not really a "standard", but it was recorded by a lot of artists at the time. Big hit, won a bunch of Grammies.

Bruce wrote:
60. Gina - Johnny Mathis


It's interesting that Mathis burst onto the scene in the late 50s and cut abou half a dozen really huge classics by the end of '59, but never again made a record that had anywhere near that lasting impact. He was still a big star and sold a ton of albums, so you'd think there would be a song from him that deserved to be higher on this list...but there isn't.

Bruce wrote:
99. My Heart Has A Mind of It's Own - Connie Francis


No apostrophe.

A case could be made that some of the big rockers have records which also qualify as traditional pop ("Yesterday", of course, and some of the big Ray Charles and Elvis hits, for starters.) But that's a dangerous road to go down and it's probably best not to include them. Maybe a sidebar list?

In the meantime, I'll have to think if there's anything missing, but it looks good overall.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 6:29 pm 
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Strong top 10, Bruce. Good job.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 7:05 pm 
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Brett Alan wrote:

5. Release Me (And Let Me Love Again) - Engelbert Humperdinck

At first, it's really jarring to see this here, because the songs around it have gained great stature as true standards, and this one--not so much. Still, what it lacks in lasting popularity and acclaim it may make up for in initial popularity--it was certainly a much bigger hit at the time then most of the others here.


Check "Release Me" in other countries aside from the USA, especially in the UK, where it was on their chart for over a year, and their chart then was only a top 50. It was the number one single of 1967 in the UK, and "What A Wonderful World" was the biggest UK single in 1968.


Last edited by Bruce on Thu Mar 28, 2013 8:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 8:14 pm 
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Brett Alan wrote:
Interesting list. We tend to think of the Sixties as the era of The Beatles, soul, psychedelia, girl groups, etc., and it was, but we forget that traditional pop was still a big thing at the time. A few thoughts:

Bruce wrote:
9. Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head - B.J. Thomas


The highest-ranking thing here by an artist with some claim to being a rocker. It's very difficult to know where to draw the line. Nothing you listed really seems too "rock" to fit, so that's good.


Yes, I decided against listing anything by Ray Charles, Elvis or "Yesterday" (or anything else) by the Beatles.

Bruce wrote:
26. Clementine - Bobby Darin

Brett Alan wrote:
HUH? This one really puzzles me. Not that big a hit (#21 pop), kind of goofy, not something I recall hearing on the radio or anything. Seems way too high to me. (Its immediate predecessor, "Beyond The Sea", would place very high if it had been released a little later.) Overall I think Darin may be overrepresented here.


You never DJ'd in North Jersey with all the mafia wannabes requesting these things all the time. "Beyond The Sea" is on the 50s list, it was out on a 1959 album. The competition is much stronger on that list though, as traditional pop was the dominant style of music for more than half the decade. Maybe "Clementine" is too high.

Bruce wrote:
51. Up-Up And Away - 5th Dimension


Brett Alan wrote:
This seems kind of low. Not really a "standard", but it was recorded by a lot of artists at the time. Big hit, won a bunch of Grammies.


It borders on being modern pop ala the Association or something, but I decided to include it.

Bruce wrote:
60. Gina - Johnny Mathis


Brett Alan wrote:
It's interesting that Mathis burst onto the scene in the late 50s and cut abou half a dozen really huge classics by the end of '59, but never again made a record that had anywhere near that lasting impact. He was still a big star and sold a ton of albums, so you'd think there would be a song from him that deserved to be higher on this list...but there isn't.


Yes, his 6-8 biggest things are all from the 50s.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 8:19 pm 
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Brett, I told Lew to switch these two so it'll look like this:

26. Up-Up And Away - 5th Dimension
51. Clementine - Bobby Darin


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Mar 28, 2013 8:52 pm 
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Bruno wrote:
Strong top 10, Bruce. Good job.


Thank you, everything fit in nicely.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 10:28 am 
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Brett Alan wrote:
In the meantime, I'll have to think if there's anything missing, but it looks good overall.


I found an important one I missed and inserted it at #25.

25. Those Were The Days - Mary Hopkin

Everything else moves down one slot with "Calcutta" dropping off.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 12:32 pm 
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I think another contender might very well be "Light My Fire". I mean, The Doors were totally doing the traditio--um, er, no, of course I mean the Jose Feliciano version. It was pretty big and led to the song gettig recorded by a lot of traditional artists who never would have touched it otherwise.

Another big standard of the '60s was "The Shadow Of Your Smile", but there's probably no one version which merits inclusion. (Tony Bennett's was probably the biggest, but it was also done by Boots Randolph who had a minor hit with it, Streisand, Shirley Bassey, Darin, and others.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 12:45 pm 
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Brett Alan wrote:
I think another contender might very well be "Light My Fire". I mean, The Doors were totally doing the traditio--um, er, no, of course I mean the Jose Feliciano version. It was pretty big and led to the song gettig recorded by a lot of traditional artists who never would have touched it otherwise.



I don't think so. It was a big R&B hit (#6 on Cash Box R&B chart) and traditional pop fans wanted to have him killed after his non-traditional rendition of the national anthem at the 1968 World Series in Detroit.



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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2013 1:09 pm 
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Brett Alan wrote:
IAnother big standard of the '60s was "The Shadow Of Your Smile", but there's probably no one version which merits inclusion. (Tony Bennett's was probably the biggest, but it was also done by Boots Randolph who had a minor hit with it, Streisand, Shirley Bassey, Darin, and others.


I agree the Bennett version has to be on the list, it was a huge grammy and Oscar award winner and was on a pretty big bennett album (Movie Song Album). I inserted it at #60 and "My Heart Has A Mind Of Its Own" drops off. I made it up to Connie by adding her as the second artist on "Al Di La."

Image


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 5:16 pm 
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Where is Barbra Streisand's "Don't Rain On My Parade"?

http://www.digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/b ... p-60s.html

Very important record for her and Broadway as a whole:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don%27t_rain_on_my_parade

Heard it on Philadelphia popular music-formatted WPEN ("The Station Of The Stars") of sainted memory, many times.

Bobby Darin had an even better version of it though:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nZW7e46sfA

By the way, you could figure he would do this song, as his taste in classic pop was nigh about impeccable, as well.

Speaking of Darin, I think he had the definitive version of "Once Upon A Time", from the 1962 musical "All American":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L92teGFYgDs

and probably among the 6 or 7 best things he ever did.

Moreover, where the hell is "Try To Remember" from the longest-ever running musical in New York, "The Fantastiks":

Here's Bobby Darin again, doing a great version that's hard to top:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sA6cLfMyb0g

From the Wikipedia page:

""Try to Remember" was originally sung by Jerry Orbach in the Original Off-Broadway production of The Fantasticks. "Try To Remember" made the Billboard Hot 100 pop chart three times in 1965 in versions by Ed Ames, Roger Williams, Barry McGuire, The Kingston Trio, The Sandpipers, and The Brothers Four. Andy Williams released a version in 1966 on his album, The Shadow of Your Smile.

The song was the first Australian hit for the then-Brisbane based trio New World, billed at the time as The New World Trio. Their version peaked at 11 in late 1968.

In 1975 Gladys Knight & the Pips had a huge international hit with their version of "Try to Remember", combining it into a medley with a cover of Barbra Streisand's "The Way We Were". It reached #11 on the Hot 100 chart. In Knight's version, she recited some of the lyrics from "Try To Remember" in spoken-word fashion before beginning to sing "The Way We Were". Harry Belafonte has recorded the song multiple times. The Greek singer Nana Mouskouri also recorded it in three languages: German, French, and Italian. Romanian singer Aura Urziceanu recorded a Romanian language version in duet with Aurelian Andreescu in 1975, Septembrie.

"Try to Remember" was used in the soundtrack of the film The Man Who Fell to Earth.

Sandy Duncan performed this song in 1976 on The Muppet Show.

Jonathon Morris performed the song in the 1995 film version of The Fantasticks, and a cover version was made by Leon Lai for the 1998 Hong Kong film City of Glass.

Donald Braswell II recorded this song on his 2007 album New Chapter.

John Barrowman recorded this song on his 2003 album Reflections from Broadway."

[end quote]

Continuing: Yes, you read that Wikipedia page on Try To Remember, and try to deny (sic) its importance for pop songs of all time. People never stopped going to that show, often just to see hear that song performed, until September the 11th.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Try_to_remember
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Speaking of Pet Clark, one of her most remembered, air-PLAYED (read: most-heavily rotated oldie of hers), and best-love songs, at least as far as the Delaware Valley is concerned, is/was "Kiss Me Goodbye", and for my money, that IS probably her best song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHIRfR9VU2M

Any chance you might have left off some very significant songs, in favor of inferior things like "Roses Are Red" by Bobby Vinton?

By the way, "Strangers In The Night", FWIW, was number 1 for at least 4 weeks on WABC 77 right in the middle of all that rock and roll, Beatles, S&G, Supremes, (etc.) or not, which is a LOT more than could be said for "Summer Wind", which may have been lucky to kiss # 6 on their survey, as best as I remember, and I don't think I'm wrong of very far off on that.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 5:37 pm 
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Another song, "The Impossible Dream" recorded by so many performers, was all over the radio and television, as well as helping sell tickets ad infinitum on Broadway for the show "Man Of La Mancha" it came from, seems to be missing from you list as well. This is inexcusable...at least if you're attempting to sniff out an all time greatest traditional popular songs of the 60s. I'm sorry, NO excuse this time. The Temptations, the R&B group non-pareil, also KNEW that song was important, which is why it had to have a place on their "Mellow Mood" album too, probably because of its reaching popularity at the time, from that splendid offering:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVlAtMZAzeY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2trMSsLqGkg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKC9N3oM728

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE8jxBH37Ho

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Imposs ... (The_Quest)


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:33 pm 
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Tom, do you have the slightest idea how to follow a criteria?

Criteria: - These songs were chosen and ranked based upon their initial and lasting popularity, acclaim, and their status as standards in the genre of traditional pop music.

These lists have nothing to do with your personal taste, or my personal taste. What you or I think is "better" is not relevant.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Traditional Pop Songs of the 1960s
PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:09 am 
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There's a reason many, if not most, people working (in their professional careers) in the field of popular traditional song sung, recorded, performed live, covered and re-made songs like "Try To Remember" (The Fantastiks), "Don't Rain On My Parade" (Funny Girl), "Once Upon A Time" (All American), or "The Impossible Dream" (Man Of La Mancha), that is people at the top tier of that kind of talent, Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Steve Lawrence, Sammy Davis Jr., Perry Como (and Nat King Cole if he had lived), Barbra Streisand pr even later performers like Neil Diamond later, and others of that calibur, because they (and their advisors in the recording industry at record companies) KNEW that these songs, among those of the highest calibur as far as 1960s era song-writing went, were the best songs, and would hold lasting popularity and high acclaim, and would hold the widest appeal to those interested (primarily) in this kind of popular music. It's not by accident either that even black R&B performers who occasionally dabbled in popular song also took up the challenge to record these kinds of songs, such as Gladys Knight (Try To Remember) or the Temptations (The Impossible Dream) because THEY recognized as well a good song when they heard it.

You wouldn't see Frank Sinatra or a Tony Bennett or a Robert Goulet recording a song like Roses Are Red; that song wouldn't have been good enough for them. They would be embarrassed to stoop to the level of recording a song like that. I bet if you asked people, songwriters (!) like Burt Bacharach or Carole King, who occupied the cusp oftentimes between popular music and rock and roll, what they think of a song like "Don't Rain On My Parade" versus, say "Roses Are Red", and they wouldn't hesitate with these tried and true songs that keep causing musicals they come from to be revived over and over again.

You've said many times you have a low opinion of Broadway music over and over again, even in the most vulgar way, so it is not a surprise to me, that somebody like you, even from Greater New York area, who has direct access to Broadway entertainment if they wanted it, is not able to put the great show business songs like these in perspective, and totally misses the high and lasting regard they are held in by people of real talent. Why don't you look up how many famous and different people over the years have tried their hand at recording and presenting songs like "Try To Remember" or "Once Upon A Time"?


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