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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:56 pm 
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PBR Streetgang wrote:
The Blue Angel - 7/10 (Jozef von Sternberg, 1930)

I remember seeing that film with some friends, and it was interesting to note when they would gradually stop laughing at the main character. At the beginning, the tone is that of gentle light-hearted mockery, we don't really consider him as a human being but more as a sort of a clown, a comedic device. What I found interesting is as the film progresses and the characer loses his humanity in the face of the other characters (from clown to slave to animal), the spectator tends to feel more and more empathy towards him, perhaps even guilt from having joined in with the laughter before. Would I have been joining in with the others in that crowd at the end without having witnessed to full extent of his humiliation?
Powerful final shot.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2012 7:27 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2012 8:04 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2012 2:01 pm 
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Location: JK Simmons has won the Oscar for Best Supporting Ac-- "You think you know me..." Shit.
That poor, poor bar.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 2:22 am 
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The Shape of Things is a really savage and great comedy, surely one of the best and most underrated of the 00s. Don't read anything about it, just put it in your Netflix queue.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 2:37 am 
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ain't no netflix in puny belgium


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 2:50 am 
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Do the equivalent. See it without reading anything about it.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 4:23 am 
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I usually never read up on any movie I see unless it's here on DDD. Viewings are fresher and I can always change my mind afterwards if I do the reading then.


All I know is Paul Rudd's in it. This probably means I will love it.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:28 am 
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Rodrigo Garcia's Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her is an UNBELIEVABLY GREAT film. Where Magnolia uses bombast, hysterics, and sentimentality, Garcia employs delicate precision, measured emotion, and an appreciation for the small resonant details of lived experience. Comes as close as anything I've seen to filling my ideal of what a medium-budget Hollywood-style film would be, if I were allowed to direct one. What a great and surprising and wonderful film to have come across. Now I need to see everything he's done.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:34 am 
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Don-Alexei wrote:
PBR Streetgang wrote:
The Blue Angel - 7/10 (Jozef von Sternberg, 1930)

I remember seeing that film with some friends, and it was interesting to note when they would gradually stop laughing at the main character. At the beginning, the tone is that of gentle light-hearted mockery, we don't really consider him as a human being but more as a sort of a clown, a comedic device. What I found interesting is as the film progresses and the characer loses his humanity in the face of the other characters (from clown to slave to animal), the spectator tends to feel more and more empathy towards him, perhaps even guilt from having joined in with the laughter before. Would I have been joining in with the others in that crowd at the end without having witnessed to full extent of his humiliation?
Powerful final shot.


This description really makes me want to see this movie.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:35 am 
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You should. One of the most powerful viewing experiences I've ever had, for sure. Great film to watch after midnight.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:51 pm 
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Shaun of the Dead
8.6/10

Hot Fuzz
8.9/10

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
8.5/10


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 6:08 am 
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Weekend
10/10


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 9:11 pm 
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Ingmar Bergman - Through a Glass Darkly

I'm a bit unsure how I feel about this film, but mostly because it demands a rewatch. I adored the first half, which I think captured the indirections and dishonesties of human interaction beautifully—especially where the falsehood shines through even our attempts at honesty. Over every line spoken hung the questions: Is this person being truthful? Is this based in fact? (Two extremely different questions) And what you get are lies based in fact and honesty based on falsehoods, and a whole host of situations where you just can't tell. Once Karin's illness started to take center stage, however, this almost seemed to get shoved to the side, and I got increasingly frustrated by the second half of the film. It seemed like this theme of the film got lost in the frankly somewhat bland (because so plainly reducible to "mere illness") tragedy of Karin's disease. By the end this event was subsumed under the real theme of the film, but I'm not entirely sure whether the ending was too abrupt, too pontificatory, too explicit, or whether it really tied together the film in the way the first half demanded. My frustration with the dominance of Karin's disease soured my mood for the end and colored my perception of it in ways that make it impossible for me to know yet which of my instincts about the ending are right and which are false. Whether or not the film ultimately succeeded, I think it may be the most interesting of the three Bergman films I've seen at its core. But then again, both Wild Strawberries and The Seventh Seal bear rewatching as well.

Other films I've seen over the past week (all second+ viewings, of sorts):

Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger - The Red Shoes
Martin Scorcese - Taxi Driver
Quentin Tarantino - Pulp Fiction
Andrei Tarkovsky - Nostalghia

In brief: The Red Shoes remains very good. I don't have much more to say after my rewatch than after my first viewing. Taxi Driver is beautiful for the explicit mockery it makes of the notion that moral notions are ever the most illuminating or interesting way of thinking about any issue worth thinking about. Pulp Fiction remains an entertaining and well-made film that grows less entertaining every time I see it. Nostalghia I wrote about in the Tarkovsky thread and I have no more words to say about it at the moment.


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 Post subject: Re: Last Film You Saw And Rate It
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:12 am 
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Just got done with Rodrigo Garcia's Nine Lives. Between this, Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her, and Ten Tiny Love Stories, my faith in the critical establishment--or fuck that, the cinephile community in general--is at just about zero. WHY THE FUCK do I only know about these movies because of one small mention on Ray Carney's mailbag? Why the FUCK isn't every single person who has learned how to watch a film screaming from the rooftops to watch this shit? What THE HELL re: the merely mild praise from critics. What the SHIT re: their saying this is nothing more than "realism". What the HELL with their not freaking out about this as much as they do about things which are similar but far far far inferior like Short Cuts or Magnolia? These films, and especially this one, are nothing short of COMPLETELY AND OTHERWORLDLY BRILLIANT. I SIMPLY CANNOT BELIEVE THEY EXIST. SEE THEM NOW WHATEVER YOU DO. This movie is better than The Godfather, it is better than Taxi Driver. If you like movies that are gorgeous and well-done because of what they tell you about life, because they give you substantial emotional/perceptual experiences (rather than simply shock tactics and roundabout ego-inflation) then these films are better than anything by Quentin Tarantino or Robert Altman or Paul Thomas Anderson. Get this: they do not just line up with my own weird philosophy about what a good movie should be. Get that out of your head. These films are flat out more well made than those. THIS IS BETTER CRAFTSMANSHIP THAN THE GODFATHER, GUY. They are more engaging viewing experiences. These should be the canonized films. This is Renoir, Bergman, Mizoguchi level stuff. You are not going to see a movie that combines gorgeous long takes (that aren't just showy long takes for the point of long takes, but gorgeous, revealing, exactingly executed long takes), with writing this brilliant, with acting this impossibly good, being made in current times. You are not going to get a movie like this, which is somehow as powerful as a melodrama while being as subtle as an Ozu film, ANYWHERE ELSE. You just aren't. So stop what you are doing and WATCH THIS MOVIE NOW! DO IT! I DON'T CARE IF YOU CAN'T FIND A TORRENT FOR IT. GET ON AMAZON AND BUY THE DVD! YOU HAVE TO SEE IT! HAVE TO HAVE TO HAVE TO HAVE TO RIGHT NOW. asldkfjaskdjflkajsdhflkjadhflkjasdfljk


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