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 Post subject: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 12:24 pm 
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100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters

Criteria: - These musicians were chosen for their originality, versatility, impact and
influence within the genre. For their innovations & the technical ability for improvisation
and musical expression in addition to their compositional skill & creative inspiration. As with all lists, this is a subjective list and makes no claim of an official nature.

List compiled by and Editor: Rick Varner

Link:
http://digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/best_jazz/best_jazztrumpet.html

1. Louis Armstrong
2. Miles Davis
3. Dizzy Gillespie
4. Clifford Brown
5. Lee Morgan
6. Roy Eldridge
7. Freddie Hubbard
8. Donald Byrd
9. Bix Biederbecke
10. Fats Navarro
11. Harry James
12. Wynton Marsalis
13. Art Farmer
14. Chet Baker
15. Roy Hargrove
16. Arturo Sandoval
17. Blue Mitchell
18. Maynard Ferguson
19. Kenny Dorham
20. Al Hirt
21. Joe 'King' Oliver
22. Woody Shaw
23. Don Cherry
24. Don Ellis
25. Doc Severinsen
26. Randy Brecker
27. Nicholas Payton
28. Thad Jones
29. Clark Terry
30. Chuck Mangione
31. Louis Prima
32. Lester Bowie
33. Nat Adderley
34. Harry 'Sweets' Edison
35. Joe Newman
36. Rick Braun
37. Russell Gunn
38. Bill Chase
39. Kenny Wheeler
40. Henry 'Red' Allen
41. Hugh Masekela
42. Herb Alpert
43. Tommy Turrentine
44. Quincy Jones
45. Charles 'Buddy' Bolden
46. Bobby Shew
47. Mugsy Spanier
48. Terence Blanchard
49. Wallace Roney
50. Jay Roulston
51. 'Doc' Cheatham
52. Chris Botti
53. Jon Faddis
54. Terrell Stafford
55. Howard McGhee
56. 'Cat' Anderson
57. Marvin Peterson
58. Marvin Stamm
59. Willie Cook
60. Tom Harrell
61. Dave Douglas
62. Mark Isham
63. Ryan Kisor
64. Shorty Rogers
65. Tim Hagans
66. Wallace Davenport
67. Johnny Coles
68. Booker Little
69. Erskine Hawkins
70. 'Hot Lips' Page
71. 'Cootie' Williams
72. Stacy Rowles
73. Richard Williams
74. Richie Vitale
75. Ray Vega
76. Idrees Sulieman
77. Lew Soloff
78. Charlie Miller
79. Jim Rotondi
80. Charles Tollivar
81. Carl Saunders
82. Bobby Lewis
83. Enrico Rava
84. Bill Coleman
85. Red Rodney
86. Ziggy Elman
87. Bunny Berigan
88. Bubber Miley
89. Punch Miller
90. Yank Lawson
91. Joe Smith
92. Frankie Newton
93. Wingy Manone
94. Ray Nance
95. Billy Butterfield
96. Tommy Ladnier
97. Jabbo Smith
98. Buck Clayton
99. Rex Stewart
100. Charles Shavers


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 12:34 pm 
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Came across this poster of a show by the Miles Davis Quintet circa 1970 which featured
Miles with
Wayne Shorter on sax
Chick Corea on piano
Dave Holland on bass
Jack DeJohnette on drums
now thats a lineup, wish I would have been there. Playing on the same bill with The Dead I can only guess that the show would have been 4-5 hours long.

http://www.wolfgangsvault.com/grateful- ... BG227.html


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2011 6:49 am 
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1. Louis Armstrong
2. Miles Davis

Can you explain me why? In terms of trumpet playing, Davis destroys Armstrong.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:54 am 
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Location: i'll send you to billy's
The fact that Louis literally invented the soloing aspect of jazz (not just trumpet, but ANY instrument) is more significant than anything Davis ever did. Without Armstrong, Davis wouldn't have even existed as an artist, let alone a trumpeter.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2011 6:54 pm 
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Location: Louisville, KY
Taro wrote:
1. Louis Armstrong
2. Miles Davis

Can you explain me why? In terms of trumpet playing, Davis destroys Armstrong.


Do you know ANYTHING about jazz at all?


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:41 pm 
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Location: Louisville, KY
Happy 110th Pops!!


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 2:01 pm 
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Location: "He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else."
http://grooveshark.com/s/Not+Really+The+Blues/1Ysp9x
Shorty Rogers w/Pete Jolly (piano), Jimmy Guiffre (sax), Curtis Counce (bass) and Shelly Manne (drums). I think.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 10:54 pm 
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Location: Louisville, KY
Few things will give me an instaboner the way the sound of Louis Armstrong's trumpet will.


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 2:44 am 
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rest in peace, donaldson toussaint l'ouverture byrd the second...


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 Post subject: Re: 100 Greatest Jazz Trumpeters
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 12:39 pm 
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Donald Byrd, trumpeter who beboped his way into the heart’s of jazz fans worldwide, dies at 80.
The Detroit native was a pioneer in jazz music and education and performed with the likes of John Coltrane, Herbie Hancock and Thelonious Monk.

Jazz musician Donald Byrd, a leading hard-bop trumpeter of the 1950s who collaborated on dozens of albums with top artists of his time and later enjoyed commercial success with hit jazz-funk fusion records such as "Black Byrd," has died. He was 80.
He died Feb. 4 in Delaware, according to Haley Funeral Directors in the Detroit suburb of Southfield, Mich., which is handling arrangements. It didn't have details on his death.
Byrd, who was also a pioneer in jazz education, attended Cass Technical High School in Detroit, played in military bands in the Air Force and moved to New York in 1955. The trumpeter, whose given name was Donaldson Toussaint L'Ouverture Byrd II, rose to national prominence when he joined Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers later that year, filling the seat in the bebop group held by his idol Clifford Brown.

He soon became one of the most in-demand trumpeters on the New York scene, playing with Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk. He also began his recording career by leading sessions for Savoy and other labels.
In 1958, he signed an exclusive recording contract with the Blue Note label and formed a band with a fellow Detroit native, baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams, making their label debut with the 1959 album "Off to the Races." The band became one of the leading exponents of the hard-bop style, which evolved from bebop and blended in elements of R&B, soul and gospel music. A 1961 recording, "Free Form," brought attention to then 20-year-old pianist Herbie Hancock.
"Donald had this beautiful tone and had a very lyrical sense of playing and a real sense of melody," said Hancock, who two years later joined Miles Davis' famed quintet and later formed his own Grammy-winning jazz-funk band.
In a telephone interview Monday night, Hancock said Byrd was a key influence earlier in his career. He said Byrd took him "under his wings" when he was a struggling musician newly arrived in New York, even letting him sleep on a hide-a-bed in his Bronx apartment for several years.
"He was the first person to let me be a permanent member of an internationally known band," Hancock added. "He has always nurtured and encouraged young musicians. He's a born educator, it seems to be in his blood, and he really tried to encourage the development of creativity."

Hancock also said Byrd encouraged him to make his debut album for Blue Note and hooked him up with Mongo Santamaria, who turned Hancock's tune "Watermelon Man" into a chart-topping hit. He also urged him to accept Davis' offer to join his quintet.
In the 1960s, Byrd, who had received his master's degree from the Manhattan School of Music, turned his attention to jazz education. He studied in Paris with composer Nadia Boulanger, became the first person to teach jazz at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and started the jazz studies department at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
Byrd began moving toward a more commercial sound with the funk-jazz fusion album "Fancy Free" in 1969, taking a path followed by fellow trumpeters Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. He teamed up with the Mizell brothers to release "Black Byrd" in 1973, a blend of jazz, R&B and funk that became Blue Note's highest selling album at the time.


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